Monthly Archives: September 2012

Treasure kids’ artwork with Artkive and Art My Kid Made

For our last bit of visual fun online, let’s look at two apps that take real-world visual art and turn it into a digital treasure.

What Is It?

ArtKive app homepageArt My Kid Made and Artkive are apps for iPhone or iPad (Android coming soon) that let you easily take a picture of a child’s artwork, add information about it, and share it with friends and family. Art moves easily from the refrigerator to the world!

How Does It Work?

Both apps work the same way:

  1. Download the app and create an account for a child
  2. Use your iPhone or iPad to take a picture of the child’s art
  3. Add the child’s name, age/grade, the date created, a title, and any additional information
  4. Save the image to the app’s cloud storage, easily accessible from anywhere in the world
  5. Share the art via email (ArtKive) or Facebook, Twitter, & Evernote (Art My Kid Made)

Screenshots of Art My Kid Made appThere are differences, though. Art My Kid Made instantly shares images to Facebook, Twitter, or Evernote, as well as uploading to its own web page. It also has a simple photo editor that lets you add “stickers,” effects, text, and crop the image to just the best bits. They also feature an “Artist of the Day” on their website and Facebook page.
 
 

Tagging screen in ArtKiveArtKive makes it easy to keep several kids’ worth of art organized by their first names, and you can create a small Share Circle of email address to send the image to only the people who care most. ArtKive will also eventually let you print the artwork as a calendar, on a mug, or as a picture book!

Why Is It Useful?

If you have children in your life at all, you know that one of the hardest things to do is to organize (or get rid of) the artwork they make at school and at home. It’s all precious, and an important part of their growing up. These two tools help you preserve and organize this part of kids’ lives, and share the art easily with friends and family.

If you’re one of those friends and family, you can use either app to help you organize art made by grandchildren, nieces & nephews, cousins, godchildren, children of close friends, students, or any other kids in your life. ArtKive, with its drop-down menu to choose the artist, makes managing multiple accounts a snap.

You can also take pictures of more than just drawings and paintings. Capture and share that A+ school assignment, the clay paperweight, an image from a school play or musical recital, or any other moment from a child’s life. Check out the Facebook pages for both apps (in the list below) for more suggestions and ideas.

Help & Resources

paper.li logo

Want to be an Online Publisher? – Using paper.li and Scoop.it

Last week, we looked at Issuu, an online newsstand full of print documents like magazines and reports. This week, let’s take a look at a similar but different idea – creating a magazine or newspaper made up of website and online images and videos.

What Is It?

paper.li logopaper.li lets you create an online newspaper from websites, images, videos, or even searches for particular terms and topics. As these sites add new posts or the searches find new results, the links appear as part of your newspaper. You need to use either a Facebook or Twitter account to log in, and then include additional sources of information.

scoop.it logoScoop.it is similar, but it’s more of a magazine than a newspaper because it has that glossy look and feel. Also, rather than adding automatic feeds from other places, you pick and choose specific pages, articles, images, or videos to add to your Scoop.it magazine. You can use your Facebook or Twitter account to log in, or create an account just for Scoop.it.

For both tools, adding content is as simple as choosing items off a list or copying and pasting URLs. You can create different sections and add your own notes and articles. Other people subscribe to your online newspaper or magazine and as it gets updated, they see new content and information. You can also add your paper.li or Scoop.it feed to a blog or website so that visitors can see the content you’ve curated.

How Is It Useful?

Just like Issuu, paper.li and Scoop.it allow anyone to create an online resource for a specific group of interested readers. With a print newspaper or magazine, you need to be able to see a large number of subscriptions to make it cost-effective. Using online tools, you can easily put together a publication for just a handful of readers who are all passionate about a particular topic.

For example, an editor named Tollcraft curates a paper.li newspaper for crafters in Tollcross and Edinburgh, Scotland. The news might be from anywhere in the world, or from right in their own neighborhood. Meanwhile, Public Relations News curated by Lee Odden is for anyone in the world who’s interested in PR or marketing.

This video from Scoop.it gives you another example:

In all of these cases, it’s the fact that real humans are curating this content – picking and choosing what gets included – that makes it most useful. Someone decided that particular websites, images, videos, or other links were relevant to a particular topic and put them all in one place. This aggregation and content curation are a way for people who don’t necessarily want to create content to be able to share other useful content instead.

Try It Out

You don’t need to create an account with either paper.li or Scoop.it to read the content that other people have created. Just visit the paper.li newsstand or browse topics in Scoop.it, click on something that looks interesting, and enjoy yourself. You can also use the search boxes at the top of each screen to find topics that are important to you.

paper.li search box
Scoop.it search box
 

If you decide you want to create your own online newspaper or magazine, read more about signing up and getting going:

Help & Resources

Taking Issuu With It

For the month of September, we’re going to focus on some great visual resources in online life. Let’s start with something familiar: an online newsstand bursting with full-color publications.

What Is It?

Issuu logoIssuu is site that features thousands of online magazines, catalog, conference reports and more. Professional-quality digital publications are available to read online, in full color, on a computer or mobile device. It’s free, easy to use, and many of the publications are gorgeous.

It’s easier to show you what Issuu is like than tell you, so click through on an example below to see it in action.

In addition to finding digital publications, Issuu is also a place where anyone can upload and show off their own visual document. All you need to do is create an account and then upload your finished document to Issuu. Share the URL for that document in email, on a blog, or from a social media account, and everyone will be able to see it quickly and easily.

Read more about how Issuu works, watch a video, or just give it a try.

How Is It Useful?

Like most of the tools we examine, Issuu is most useful because it takes a document or publication and makes it available to anyone with an internet connection, wherever they are. In addition, Issuu highlights new and popular publications each month, making it easier for other people to find the most interesting titles. Issuu’s search isn’t the best, but it does organize things by category and popularity as well as by how new it is.

Try It Out

If you just want to browse Issuu and see what other people have done, start at the home page and click on a featured title. You can also start at the publications page, then: Use the search box at the top to look for a particular topic, choose the language you want or the type of document you’re looking for to get more specific results, and use the facets down the side to browse by subject.

Search bar at the top of Issuu.com page

Help & Resources

Happy Labor Day

Due to the holiday, there’ll be no Learning for Life Online post today. Enjoy your day in the sun (if you’re in New England) and we’ll be back on the 10th to start a month of exploring visual life online. See you next week!