Tag Archives: definitions

Upload, Download, Attach, Save

Moving files around on the web has become something we do all the time, whether we know what we’re doing or not: sending and receiving documents by email, applying for jobs online, sharing photos and music, and buying audio and video online. But what’s the difference between uploading, downloading, attaching and saving?

Uploading just means moving a file from the computer you are working on up to the web. Usually, the button you would click to upload a file says Upload, but it might also ask you to Browse (look around on) your computer to find a file to upload. You might upload a resume file to a job application site, upload a song file to a music sharing site, upload a photo file to Flickr or Facebook, or upload a video file to YouTube.

Downloading is the opposite of uploading: you move a file from the web down to the computer you’re working on. Again, the button usually says Download or asks you to Browse to look for a file. Downloading is also what happens when you borrow an electronic item from the library, buy music or videos from Amazon or iTunes, or save a photo from your web-based email or Facebook onto your computer.

An attachment is a file that you attach to an email message in order to send both the message and the file at the same time. The icon for an attachment is a paper clip, and that’s just what you’re doing: paper-clipping another document to the message you’ve got and sending them both along together. Most kinds of files can be attached to an email message: documents, photos, audio and video. You can also receive attachments in email from other people, which you can download onto your computer. Safety note: Do not open attachments you’re not expecting from people you don’t know or email addresses you don’t recognize. These attachments are one way that viruses get around and infect computers, and can cause you a major headache.

Saving a file means storing it on your computer or a storage device permanently. You can save a letter you’re typing, save a presentation you’ve created or save a photo from your camera onto your computer or to a USB drive. Unlike uploading, downloading or attaching, when you save a file your computer doesn’t need to be connected to the web. In fact, you need to save a document or a presentation to your computer or a USB drive before you can upload or attach it anywhere else.

Help & Resources

Email – Some Definitions

Email is exactly what it sounds like: electronic mail. Emailed messages are sent from one address to other specific addresses directly, and may have documents, photos or other files attached.

Email Providers

Web-based email is email that is entirely online: you visit a website to log in to your account, your email is stored on your email service’s computers, and nothing is ever stored on your computer unless you choose to download it and save it. You can log in to web-based email from any internet browser in the world and from that service’s app on your smartphone or tablet.

Provider-based email is email that your internet service provider offers you as part of your service. Comcast, Verizon, RCN, or any other service provider may offer email that they store on their servers, like web-based email. You access this email using a web browser or from a web-ready television.

Institution-based email is email you get through work, school, or another organization. You usually access this email using a web browser or directly through a client (see below) on your work computer.

Self-hosted email is email you or a friend/acquaintance hosts for you. If you run your own website, you may also get email with that website address provided as part of your web hosting service.

Email Access

All of the above terms refer to who provides and manages your email address for you, in the same way that the US postal service is in charge of managing postal addresses for physical buildings. You can get to, view and store your email using either web-based email or client-based email.

Just as before, web-based email means that your email lives somewhere else out on the internet, not on your home computer. You use a web browser to go to your email provider’s page, log in, and view your email there.

Client-based email means that there is a piece of software on your home computer that you use to access your email. Microsoft Outlook and Mac Mail are two of the most common clients; Thunderbird, Opera and others are also available. Many of these clients also have apps for your iPhone or Android to let you receive your mail on your mobile device.

Help & Resources