Tag Archives: images

Five Search Engines You Haven’t Heard of…Yet

With all our coverage of privacy, security, and account settings, April was a pretty heavy month here at Learning for Life Online. Let’s celebrate spring by lightening things up a little bit in May. We’ll start by showcasing five search engines (similar to Google or Bing) that you might not have heard about.
 

Duck Duck Go logoDuck Duck Go is a nifty alternative to Google, Bing and the rest. To use this all-purpose, general search engine, just type in whatever you’re looking for into the search box and click. For tips, tricks and shortcuts to get very specific information quickly, check out their special “goodies” searches page.
 

Million Short logoWhat if you’re not looking for the most popular results? What if you want something obscure, or want to find the small stuff without having to skip past all the answers you already know? Try Million Short, a search engine that will let you cut off the top million, hundred thousand, thousand, or hundred results and get to websites and pages you may have never seen before. This isn’t a search engine you’d use all the time, but if you want to really research a topic online, it would help get to the weird stuff more quickly.
 

Spezify logoSpezify is an entirely different kind of search engine – rather than a list of results, you get a visual collection of images, video and text spread out in front of you. No, it’s not in a particular order, but you can quickly see whether something is useful to you by just looking. Lots of fun, especially if you’re looking for photos or images.
 

EcoFreek logoEcoFreek is a search engine that specifically looks for items that other people are giving away, willing to swap for, selling at a garage sale, or are otherwise free or really cheap. Type whatever you’re looking for into the search box, choose what part of the world you’re in, then click Search. You’ll get a list of results with a short description; if one of them sounds like what you want, click through to the original listing to see if it’s still available.
 

BookFinder logoTired of searching Amazon first to find books to buy? Try BookFinder, a search engine just for books. It’s great for out of print or hard-to-find items, and has an international focus for better non-English language materials.
 

I Like Using Google – Why Change?

If you were shopping for just the right shirt, you wouldn’t look in one store and then stop when you didn’t find it, would you? Same thing with search engines – the same one will tend to give you the same sorts of answers. To really know what’s out there, you need to try your search in different places, and compare the results you get from each one.

There are hundreds of search engines available, some more general and some for very specific topics. Don’t just trust results from the big three – take one step further and see what else is out there.

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Copyright vs. Creative Commons licenses

This week on Learning for Life Online, we’ll take a quick look at the idea of copyright, and how the idea of protecting your creative work has been changed by the internet.

What is Copyright?

In the United States, copyright exists to keep people from copying someone else’s work and either claiming it as their own work or making money from selling or licensing that work. There are exceptions for fair use for commentary, criticism, and research and educational purposes, but in general if something is protected by copyright, you can’t copy or reuse that content. Copyright was intended to protect the ability of writers, artists, filmmakers, and other creative professionals to make a living doing what they do.

The U.S. Copyright Office has a great Frequently Asked Questions page to explain the basics; you can also read the entirety of U.S. Copyright Law online. Students and teachers can learn more about copyright and education from the Library of Congress.

What is Public Domain

Creative works that are not under copyright are in the public domain. This means that it is okay to use or reuse any part or whole of that work however you’d like. Most texts or images created before 1923 in the United States are in the public domain and are freely available, but there are many rules about what is and isn’t in the public domain.

What is Creative Commons?

Making text, audio, video and photos available on the Internet has made it easier for creative professionals to share their work, and it also makes it easier to copy and reuse that work. Creative Commons is an organization created to find ways to let creative professionals maintain ownership of their work and give permission for others to use or remix that work in specific ways. They do this by writing up Creative Commons licenses – legal documents that spell out what other people can and can’t do with content. A creator putting their work up on the internet can choose which Creative Commons (CC) license they want to use, and link to it from wherever they’ve put their content. Then, if someone else wants to use that content, they can click through and read the license to know what’s okay.

To understand what CC licenses will and won’t allow, there are a few terms that need explaining. Flickr provides some good definitions:

  • Attribution means: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work – and derivative works based upon it – but only if they give you credit.
  • Noncommercial means: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work – and derivative works based upon it – but for noncommercial purposes only.
  • No Derivative Works means: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.
  • Share Alike means: You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that you released your work under.

You can also watch and hear what Creative Commons means to creators in their own words. For more, check out an entire page of videos that explain Creative Commons and the Creative Commons Frequently Asked Questions page.

Why Does It Matter?

Why does all this matter?
Because ignoring copyright – using someone else’s protected work without their permission – is wrong and illegal in the U.S.
Because getting permission from creative professionals who want to give it should be easy and obvious, to encourage sharing and remixing whenever it’s allowed.
Because some excellent things come from sharing and remixing content online: music mashups combining different songs, video mashups that bring together different television and film snippets (for instance, an alternate ending to Back to the Future), tools like Tumblr and Scoop.It, and more.
Because as you learn how to live a life online, understanding these two points of view make it easy to be a respectful, ethical, law-abiding online resident. Whether you create content, reuse it, or simply enjoy it where it is, it helps to keep everyone on the same page – virtual or not.

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