Tag Archives: scoop.it

paper.li logo

Want to be an Online Publisher? – Using paper.li and Scoop.it

Last week, we looked at Issuu, an online newsstand full of print documents like magazines and reports. This week, let’s take a look at a similar but different idea – creating a magazine or newspaper made up of website and online images and videos.

What Is It?

paper.li logopaper.li lets you create an online newspaper from websites, images, videos, or even searches for particular terms and topics. As these sites add new posts or the searches find new results, the links appear as part of your newspaper. You need to use either a Facebook or Twitter account to log in, and then include additional sources of information.

scoop.it logoScoop.it is similar, but it’s more of a magazine than a newspaper because it has that glossy look and feel. Also, rather than adding automatic feeds from other places, you pick and choose specific pages, articles, images, or videos to add to your Scoop.it magazine. You can use your Facebook or Twitter account to log in, or create an account just for Scoop.it.

For both tools, adding content is as simple as choosing items off a list or copying and pasting URLs. You can create different sections and add your own notes and articles. Other people subscribe to your online newspaper or magazine and as it gets updated, they see new content and information. You can also add your paper.li or Scoop.it feed to a blog or website so that visitors can see the content you’ve curated.

How Is It Useful?

Just like Issuu, paper.li and Scoop.it allow anyone to create an online resource for a specific group of interested readers. With a print newspaper or magazine, you need to be able to see a large number of subscriptions to make it cost-effective. Using online tools, you can easily put together a publication for just a handful of readers who are all passionate about a particular topic.

For example, an editor named Tollcraft curates a paper.li newspaper for crafters in Tollcross and Edinburgh, Scotland. The news might be from anywhere in the world, or from right in their own neighborhood. Meanwhile, Public Relations News curated by Lee Odden is for anyone in the world who’s interested in PR or marketing.

This video from Scoop.it gives you another example:

In all of these cases, it’s the fact that real humans are curating this content – picking and choosing what gets included – that makes it most useful. Someone decided that particular websites, images, videos, or other links were relevant to a particular topic and put them all in one place. This aggregation and content curation are a way for people who don’t necessarily want to create content to be able to share other useful content instead.

Try It Out

You don’t need to create an account with either paper.li or Scoop.it to read the content that other people have created. Just visit the paper.li newsstand or browse topics in Scoop.it, click on something that looks interesting, and enjoy yourself. You can also use the search boxes at the top of each screen to find topics that are important to you.

paper.li search box
Scoop.it search box
 

If you decide you want to create your own online newspaper or magazine, read more about signing up and getting going:

Help & Resources

Copyright vs. Creative Commons licenses

This week on Learning for Life Online, we’ll take a quick look at the idea of copyright, and how the idea of protecting your creative work has been changed by the internet.

What is Copyright?

In the United States, copyright exists to keep people from copying someone else’s work and either claiming it as their own work or making money from selling or licensing that work. There are exceptions for fair use for commentary, criticism, and research and educational purposes, but in general if something is protected by copyright, you can’t copy or reuse that content. Copyright was intended to protect the ability of writers, artists, filmmakers, and other creative professionals to make a living doing what they do.

The U.S. Copyright Office has a great Frequently Asked Questions page to explain the basics; you can also read the entirety of U.S. Copyright Law online. Students and teachers can learn more about copyright and education from the Library of Congress.

What is Public Domain

Creative works that are not under copyright are in the public domain. This means that it is okay to use or reuse any part or whole of that work however you’d like. Most texts or images created before 1923 in the United States are in the public domain and are freely available, but there are many rules about what is and isn’t in the public domain.

What is Creative Commons?

Making text, audio, video and photos available on the Internet has made it easier for creative professionals to share their work, and it also makes it easier to copy and reuse that work. Creative Commons is an organization created to find ways to let creative professionals maintain ownership of their work and give permission for others to use or remix that work in specific ways. They do this by writing up Creative Commons licenses – legal documents that spell out what other people can and can’t do with content. A creator putting their work up on the internet can choose which Creative Commons (CC) license they want to use, and link to it from wherever they’ve put their content. Then, if someone else wants to use that content, they can click through and read the license to know what’s okay.

To understand what CC licenses will and won’t allow, there are a few terms that need explaining. Flickr provides some good definitions:

  • Attribution means: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work – and derivative works based upon it – but only if they give you credit.
  • Noncommercial means: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work – and derivative works based upon it – but for noncommercial purposes only.
  • No Derivative Works means: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.
  • Share Alike means: You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that you released your work under.

You can also watch and hear what Creative Commons means to creators in their own words. For more, check out an entire page of videos that explain Creative Commons and the Creative Commons Frequently Asked Questions page.

Why Does It Matter?

Why does all this matter?
Because ignoring copyright – using someone else’s protected work without their permission – is wrong and illegal in the U.S.
Because getting permission from creative professionals who want to give it should be easy and obvious, to encourage sharing and remixing whenever it’s allowed.
Because some excellent things come from sharing and remixing content online: music mashups combining different songs, video mashups that bring together different television and film snippets (for instance, an alternate ending to Back to the Future), tools like Tumblr and Scoop.It, and more.
Because as you learn how to live a life online, understanding these two points of view make it easy to be a respectful, ethical, law-abiding online resident. Whether you create content, reuse it, or simply enjoy it where it is, it helps to keep everyone on the same page – virtual or not.

Help & Resources